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Blog Category - Nolensville

Join us for two Model Grand Openings at Nolen Mill

Categories: Events, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Nashville, New Community, Nolensville, Williamson County | Posted: September 17, 2018

Join us for two Model Grand Openings at Nolen Mill…

Thursday, Sept 27th

11am-1pm

Ribbon Cutting at 11:30am

103 Madison Mill Drive

Lunch served at 103 Madison Mill Drive

Dessert Served at 600 Weybridge Drive

Door prizes from local merchants

Click HERE for Flyer

125-home active adult community planned on Nolensville Pike

Categories: Cottages, Davidson County, Nolensville, Press Release | Posted: July 20, 2016

(Staff/Tennessean: Getahn Ward, gward@tennessean.com) Click HERE for full article.

Price of courtyard cottages at Williams Mill to start in the low $300,000s.

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One of the Nashville area’s largest homebuilders is behind plans for an active-adult community with 125 attached courtyard cottages at the southwest corner of Nolensville Pike and Holt Road.

On behalf of Gallatin-based Goodall Homes, engineering firm Land Solutions Co. is pursuing specific plan residential zoning for nearly 39 acres at 6415 and 6419 Holt Road where the Williams Mill community is planned.

Construction should start by early 2018. The starting price for the cottages at Williams Mill is expected to be in the low $300,000s.

Bob Goodall, president of Goodall Homes, sees Williams Mill catering to residents of that South Nashville community and nearby Brentwood who want to downsize and remain in that area after retiring.

“It’s a specific product for people 55 and up who want to downsize from their 5,000-square-foot house on 4 acres to a completely homeowners association-maintained environment that’s one level and wheelchair-accessible,” added Robert Swope, the area’s Metro councilman. “It has no impact on schools and very reduced impact on traffic.”

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Williams Mill, which is on the Metro Planning Commission’s agenda for July 14, is among new active adult communities on the drawing board for the Nashville area. Craighead Development and Ole South Properties are pursuing The Binns 500-home active adult community for a site in Hermitage, while Southern Springs by Del Webb in Spring Hill is expected to include 600 homes.

The 125 cottages at Williams Mill will be built in phases with completion expected by the end of 2021. Each of the at least 1,475-square-foot homes with optional bonus room available will have a cottage-style exterior, zero-step entry, wider doorways, private courtyard and two-car garage. A clubhouse, walking trails and community garden are among planned amenities.

Swope said Goodall made changes to Williams Mill based on input from neighbors. A day care center that’s going up on the other side of Holt Road from the Williams Mill site is among other developments in the area that’s roughly a mile from the Williamson County line.

Rose Marie Beaster, who lives across the street from the Williams Mill site, has concerns about blasting and increased traffic from new projects in the area.

“I’m sort of torn,” she said. “Because of the widening of Nolensville Road, we know something’s eventually going in there. I’ve seen worse projects proposed for that corner that the neighborhood was able to stop, but is this the best thing?”

The cottages at Williams Mill would be similar to buildings by Goodall Homes at The Cottages at Bent Creek in Nolensville, The Retreat at Fairvue in Gallatin, Waters Edge in Franklin and Millstone in Hendersonville.

What boomers want: Active adult communities designed just for them

Categories: Condominium, Cottages, Franklin, Gallatin, Goodall News, Housing Market, Lenox Place, Neighborhood, Nolensville, Realtor News, Subdivision, Sumner County, The Cottages at Bent Creek, The Tennessean, Williamson County | Posted: January 12, 2016

(This article is from the Tennessean on January 9, 2016.  It was written by Bill Lewis.  Please click here to view the original article.)

Lenox Place Model Home (Low Res) (10 of 31)

Patty Bellar wanted the comfort, convenience and security of a one-level home closer to her grandchildren, so she purchased a house in one of the growing number of Nashville-area communities restricted to homeowners 55 and older.

Her neighbors, from states including Illinois, Arizona and Michigan, had the same idea.

“All of us downsized to be closer to our kids and grandchildren,” said Bellar, who moved from Robertson County to the Cottages at Bent Creek subdivision in Nolensville, where Goodall Homes is building 36 homes reserved for buyers at least 55 years old.

“Any builder is smart not to ignore this market,” said Bellar.

A fast-growing market

Home builders are taking her advice and planning construction of more than 1,300 homes in age-restricted communities across the region.

A partnership of Craighead Development and Ole South, one of the area’s largest home builders, hopes to launch The Binns, a 500-home active adult community planned for 285 acres off Lebanon Road in Hermitage.

In Lebanon, 240 active adult residences are planned at Hamilton Springs, Middle Tennessee’s first mass transit subdivision, which is being developed around a depot for the Music City Star commuter train.

In Spring Hill, Del Webb is launching Southern Springs on the Maury County side of the city. The community will have 600 homes on more than 300 acres. The company previously developed the 1,000-plus-home Lake Providence community in Mt. Juliet.

“Of the 76 million baby boomers in this country, 50 percent are between the ages of 50 and 58, which makes the over-50 buyer one of the fastest-growing consumer groups. With the recent completion of our Lake Providence community, there is no active adult community to meet the housing and lifestyle needs of the active baby boomer in Tennessee,” said Jon Cherry, Del Webb’s president in the state.

Goodall Homes, the company that built Bellar’s house in the Cottages at Bent Creek, has just 10 homes left to sell in that neighborhood. This year the company expects to build an additional 30 homes at Lenox Place, an active adult community in Gallatin. Lenox Place will have a total of about 240 homes when it is full, said Chris O’Neal, the company’s chief sales officer.

“We hear a common theme from our customers,” he said. “Their children have moved out and they need something with less upkeep.”

Homes for active adults feature one-level living, no-step entries and interior doorways wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair. Exterior maintenance is performed by the homeowner’s association.

Bellar said those are the features she was looking for. She’s mobile and active, but was planning ahead.

“You don’t believe there will come a day, but I just didn’t want steps,” she said.

A successful blueprint

Bill Hostettler, chief manager of Craighead Development, said Del Webb’s success at Lake Providence proves that demand is growing for active adult communities.

“We want to copy Del Webb in Mt. Juliet,” he said of plans for The Binns in Hermitage.

Nashville has a lack of housing that appeals to the active adults moving to Middle Tennessee, said Hostettler.

“They want to live near the grandkids, but it’s hard for them to find a nice home on a small lot,” he said.

The community will feature homes ranging from 1,200 to 2,500 square feet. Most will be single-level, but some may feature an upstairs bonus room. That floor plan has proven popular in other communities because the bonus area can be converted to quarters for a caregiver.

The site’s current agriculture zoning allows homes on two-acre lots. The developers are requesting a change to allow 1.75 homes per acre. More than half of the 285-acre site will be preserved as green space.

The proposed site is near the city’s Stones River Bend Park and is close to shopping and a YMCA.

The developers intend to donate several acres for expansion of adjacent Hermitage Elementary School. They will give another 40 acres to the city to extend a greenway along the Cumberland River.

“Think about getting on your bike and riding downtown,” said Hostettler. “You could ride your bike to the football game.”

Reach Bill Lewis at 615-262-5862 or wlewis77229@comcast.net.

Williamson County Sets Record on Median Home Price

Categories: Canterbury, Community Service, Franklin, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Housing Market, Investment Opportunity, Ladd Park, Lockwood Glen, Nashville Area Homebuilder, Neighborhood, New Community, New Homes Nashville Area, Nolensville, One Level Floorplan, Realtor News, Rizer Point, Single Family Home, Subdivision, The Tennessean, Thompson's Station, Townhome, Townhomes, Williamson County | Posted: February 11, 2014

The housing market is hot, and home prices are climbing.  This is great for people who are already homeowners in this market, as they are gaining equity by the day!  If you are on the fence and are considering making a new home purchase at one of our Williamson County communities, deciding now will help you have some instant equity, too!

Currently, Goodall Homes is selling in the following Williamson County communities:

Bent Creek (Nolensville), Canterbury (Thompson’s Station), Ladd Park (Franklin), Lockwood Glen (Franklin), Rizer Point (Franklin), and Shadow Green (Franklin)

Click HERE to see the Tennessean article from February 10, 2014.

Goodall Homes Ranked the #5 Fastest-Growing Private Company in Nashville

Categories: Awards, Community Service, Davidson County, Employee News, Franklin, Gallatin, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Hendersonville, Housing Market, Lebanon, Mount Juliet, Nashville Area Homebuilder, Nashville Business Journal, National Housing Market, Neighborhood, New Homes Nashville Area, Nolensville, Realtor News, Single Family Home, StoneBridge, Subdivision, Sumner County, Team, TN Homes, Townhome, Villas, Williamson County, Wilson County | Posted: September 24, 2013

According to the Nashville Business JournalGoodall Homes is at the “Top of the List”, and is officially the 5th fastest-growing private company in Nashville, based on revenue growth from 2009-2012!  Click HERE to see who rounded out the top five.

It’s an honor to be a part of such a cohesive team, and, of course, we wouldn’t have any of this success without our customers.  If you are in the market for a new home in the Nashville area, we hope this gives you the confidence you need in Goodall Homes.

We currently have new single family, villa, townhome, and condo communities in Davidson, Sumner, Wilson, and Williamson Counties.

To learn more about Goodall Homes, please visit our website at www.goodallhomes.com.  To schedule an appointment to meet with a New Home Consultant at any of our neighborhoods, please call (615) 448-8929, or email Amber Davis at goodallonline@goodallhomes.com.

 

Wind and Cold Temps Don’t Slow Down Franklin Realtor Event

Categories: Community Service, Employee News, Events, Franklin, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Nashville Area Homebuilder, Neighborhood, Nolensville, Single Family Home, Subdivision, Team, Thompson's Station, Williamson County | Posted: October 31, 2012

"Doctors" at the fictitious Goodall Community Hospital gave out prescriptions detailing available market homes in the area.

Goodall Homes hosted a very creative and exciting Realtor Chili Lunch at our Ladd Park community today.  During the event, Goodall representatives pretended to be working for “Goodall Community Hospital”, dressed up in lab coats and scrubs, while handing out “prescriptions” for realtors to put in the First Aid Kits that were given to them upon their arrival.  There were a total of 8 prescriptions, and each one highlighted a market home that is available between now and the end of the year in our Williamson County communities of Bent Creek (Nolensville), Ladd Park (Franklin), and Canterbury (Thompson’s Station).  These prescriptions were obtained by visiting homes throughout the community as they learned more about Goodall’s available Market Homes and floorplans.  After eating a filling lunch consisting of chili, chips and dip, and multiple delicious desserts, Realtors hopped aboard “ambulances” (aka, Goodall vans) and took off for various homes throughout Ladd Park.  Once all 8 prescriptions were gathered, Realtors returned to the Model Home to redeem a $20 gift card to Target.  Three lucky winners also received a $250 gift card for Southwest Airlines.  The winners were Jack Allen (Exit Realty), Mike Nastri (Keller Williams), and Mark Pfiffner (Prudential Woodmont).  All in all, we had the opportunity to visit with about 60+ realtors today, and are better because of it!

Goodall Homes at Bent Creek–A Happy Homeowner Experience

Categories: Community Service, Easy Living Home, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Neighborhood, Nolensville, Realtor News, TN Homes, Williamson County | Posted: May 17, 2012

Tom, Alissa and family are very excited about their new home purchase!

This is very possibly the happiest family in middle-Tennessee!  Tom and Alissa came into Goodall Homes’ Bent Creek community last week with a specific need–a five-bedroom home for under $300,000.  They stumbled upon our model home and walked through, waiting on the Sales Representative, Angela Dover, to finish up with another customer.  When they stated their need to Angela, she was able to show them our Richmond II floorplan, which has the owner’s suite downstairs, and the remaining four bedrooms upstairs.  This was perfect for Tom and Alissa, who are planning a wedding for August, and have four children between the two of them, ranging in age from 6-19.
After discussing more details about the Richmond II with Angela, and after looking at the available homesites, Tom and Alissa (and kids) decided that this was going to be the perfect home for them!
After Tom and Alissa signed their purchase agreement with Angela, they discussed taking a picture at their new homesite.  Tom and Alissa wanted to include their children in this event, so they came back the next day and took the two pictures you see here.  They are so excited about their new home, and will be closing on it in mid-October.
As you can see, Goodall Homes is doing more than just running a business–we are making people’s dreams come true!  Thanks, Tom and Alissa, for letting us share your story!  We couldn’t be happier for you all!  Welcome home!

This precious family can't wait to move into their new Goodall home at Bent Creek.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take a Peek at Goodall Homes at Bent Creek in Nolensville, TN

Categories: Easy Living Home, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Housing Market, Nashville Area Homebuilder, New Homes Nashville Area, Nolensville, One Level Floorplan, Realtor News, Single Family Home, Williamson County | Posted: March 8, 2012

Bustling Real Estate Market ‘Feels Like 2006 Again’

Categories: Events, Franklin, Gallatin, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Housing Market, Nashville Area Homebuilder, Nolensville, Realtor News, Single Family Home, Sumner County, The Tennessean, TN Homes, Williamson County | Posted: February 24, 2012

Agents see surge in home sales with new and existing inventory

(Thank you to Jeanne Reasonover of The Tennessean for this article in the Williamson AM.)

Angela Dover sets out an open house sign in front of the Bent Creek Model Home in Nolensville.

Area realty agents say the real estate business in Williamson County is picking up tremendously.

Wendy Monday, an agent with Bob Parks Realty, says Multiple Listing Service figures show home sales across its database were up 25 percent in January over January 2011.

“As an agency, our sales are up 100 percent for the same time period,” Monday said. “It feels like 2006 again. Activity is widespread across Williamson County, and in all price ranges.”

Monday said she’s seeing a resurgence in sales of existing homes as well as in new construction.

“I see a lot of movement in the $300,000 to $400,000 niche and also in the high end, $800,000 and up. The interest rates remain low and buyers and sellers are seeing, I think, that we’ve hit bottom on home prices and those prices are beginning to rise,” she said.

She attributes the surge to several factors, consumer confidence included.

“People are feeling better about the economy and about their jobs. There’s a lot of pent-up demand, as well. I see a lot of young families looking for larger homes. Plus, the economy in Williamson County is so healthy. I have young families moving up in home size from Davidson to Williamson because of the school system in Williamson,” she said.

Fear factor dissipates

Janell Glasgow-Hall, an agent with Crye Leike, says she saw improvement in the market in 2011 and that it has continued to pick up.

“A house listed in Brent Meade sold in just 10 days recently,” she said. “I’m seeing sales across Brentwood surge, and also in Spring Hill. I saw a foreclosure in Spring Hill have an offer two days after it was listed.”

She says the upper-end sales are surging, too.

“I had a client in the $750,000 to $1 million range back in 2010 that looked at 75 houses and never bought. The fear factor was just too great for many buyers. Now, homes are selling. The fear factor seems to be far less dominant now,” she said.

Discouraged sellers have reason to hope

Lisa Culp Taylor, an agent with Bob Parks Realty, says she’s seeing buyers who can’t find what they want in existing listings, so she and other agents are going back to revisit expired listings.

“So many sellers just gave up and let listings expire or took houses off the market. As a result, there’s just not that much inventory now,” she said.

“Homeowners always wait until spring to list their home, but I’m advising anyone who plans to sell to get it on the market now because we sure have buyers.”

Culp Taylor says it’s not a sellers’ market yet, but she said he believes we’ve hit bottom and prices are starting to increase again.

“I think so many people have just gotten tired of waiting to buy a home,” she said. “Consumer confidence is up and they’re taking the plunge.”

Culp Taylor, who specializes in new construction, says as of January, the market is the best in Williamson County that she’s personally seen since 2007.

Susan Gregory, another Bob Parks agent, says building lots are selling like hotcakes.

“Tuscany Hills, a Brentwood community, opened its second phase recently. Three of nine lots sold within a month,” she said. “I’ve seen a house at $720,000 get an offer within two days with three more buyers lined up if the first falls through.”

She had a listing in Willow Springs that for six months had no activity until recently, when a contract was signed.

“Since the Parade of Homes in Annandale at the end of October, more than 30 lots have sold, and those will end up being $1 million homes,” Gregory said. “Now, builders are gobbling up lots because there are so few these days. And it takes one year for a development to go from planning to online with lots.

“The banks just weren’t lending for so long and so many builders were weeded out that now the pent-up demand is surging.”

Try a new appraisal

Gregory says she’s seeing sales increase at prices from $200,000 to $1 million and up.

She advises anyone who had their home appraised in 2011 to consider having it re-appraised now.

“I have a client who had an appraisal in 2011; she just had it appraised again a few weeks ago and the appraisal was $30,000 higher,” Gregory said. “I do recommend appraisals for the sake of sellers, buyers and lenders.”

Christina Gregory, a realty agent who represents The Governors Club, says it has had more interested home buyers in January and February than she’s seen in the four years she has been there.

“In Governors Club, we have 10 new homes at an average price of $1 million each under construction; four of those 10 were started in 2012,” she said. “We’re running out of lots. We have only 13 remaining, and we predict they’ll be gone before year’s end.”

Lisa Culp Taylor, an agent with Bob Parks Realty, says she’s seeing buyers who can’t find what they want in existing listings, so she and other agents are going back to revisit expired listings.

“So many sellers just gave up and let listings expire or took houses off the market. As a result, there’s just not that much inventory now,” she said.

“Homeowners always wait until spring to list their home, but I’m advising anyone who plans to sell to get it on the market now because we sure have buyers.”

Culp Taylor says it’s not a sellers’ market yet, but she said he believes we’ve hit bottom and prices are starting to increase again.

“I think so many people have just gotten tired of waiting to buy a home,” she said. “Consumer confidence is up and they’re taking the plunge.”

Culp Taylor, who specializes in new construction, says as of January, the market is the best in Williamson County that she’s personally seen since 2007.

Susan Gregory, another Bob Parks agent, says building lots are selling like hotcakes.

“Tuscany Hills, a Brentwood community, opened its second phase recently. Three of nine lots sold within a month,” she said. “I’ve seen a house at $720,000 get an offer within two days with three more buyers lined up if the first falls through.”

She had a listing in Willow Springs that for six months had no activity until recently, when a contract was signed.

“Since the Parade of Homes in Annandale at the end of October, more than 30 lots have sold, and those will end up being $1 million homes,” Gregory said. “Now, builders are gobbling up lots because there are so few these days. And it takes one year for a development to go from planning to online with lots.

“The banks just weren’t lending for so long and so many builders were weeded out that now the pent-up demand is surging.”

Try a new appraisal

Gregory says she’s seeing sales increase at prices from $200,000 to $1 million and up.

She advises anyone who had their home appraised in 2011 to consider having it re-appraised now.

“I have a client who had an appraisal in 2011; she just had it appraised again a few weeks ago and the appraisal was $30,000 higher,” Gregory said. “I do recommend appraisals for the sake of sellers, buyers and lenders.”

Christina Gregory, a realty agent who represent The Governors Club, says it has had more interested home buyers in January and February than she’s seen in the four years she has been there.

“In Governors Club, we have 10 new homes at an average price of $1 million each under construction; four of those 10 were started in 2012,” she said. “We’re running out of lots. We have only 13 remaining, and we predict they’ll be gone before year’s end.”

The Tennessean Reports: “Home Building Begins to Rise in Parts of Middle Tennessee”

Categories: Gallatin, Goodall Homes, Goodall News, Hendersonville, Housing Market, Investment Opportunity, Mount Juliet, Nashville Area Homebuilder, New Homes Nashville Area, Nolensville, One Level Floorplan, Realtor News, Single Family Home, Sumner County, TN Homes, Williamson County, Wilson County | Posted: January 6, 2012

(This is a great article in today’s Tennessean, written by Bobby Allyn.)

Although single-family home construction has dropped dramatically since the economic downturn, fresh momentum is slowly picking up in some corners of Middle Tennessee.

New home building over the past 12 months in a number of Nashville’s suburban counties has improved from 2010, with the best improvement in Williamson County.

According to home tracker Metrostudy, Williamson County’s newly built homes rose 15 percent year-over-year as prices in some parts became relatively more affordable.

Sumner County’s large rural stretches quenched the thirst of homebuyers who prefer bigger lots, propping up new home construction there by 7 percent. Realtors said low property tax rates underpinned a 2 percent year-over-year boost in homes being built in Wilson County.

In an industry that hails any positive news as cause for celebration, local real estate experts welcomed the patchy surge in new home building, while admitting that the current numbers are far from the levels enjoyed amid peak times before the recession some six years ago.

“It reflects the availability of land, it reflects the price of land and how much harder it is to build in-fill homes,” said Jay Lowenthal, broker with Zeitlin Realtors. “More homes are coming out of the ground now because people are starting to understand the deals that are in front of them.”

But not all the data were vibrant.

Despite new home growth in areas of Davidson County’s southern and eastern edges, in locales like Bellevue and Hermitage, home building in the county overall declined 21 percent year over year. In addition, building permits reportedly dropped 20 percent in Rutherford County.

Recovery is gradual, uneven

Real estate experts say that Middle Tennessee’s new home construction is beginning a gradual recovery, faster than the nation’s rebound in home starts. In fact, the U.S. Commerce Department reported earlier this week that November’s single-family home construction rose 1.5 percent, coming just as the average rate for a 30-year-fixed rate mortgage loan fell to 3.91 percent, a historic low.

Richard Bell, president of Turnberry Homes, built 98 homes in Williamson County last year, double the previous year’s rate.

He said homebuyers are eschewing large garages in exchange for “better utilized space,” which translates into lower heating and more modest electric bills at a time when consumers are increasingly cost-conscious.

Furthermore, areas with ample land on the outskirts of Nashville will spring back faster than communities within the city’s core, Bell said, because they generally have lower unemployment rates, thus they’re arguably better positioned for recovery. For instance, Williamson’s unemployment rate in November was 5.6 percent, compared with Nashville-Mursfreesboro’s 7.2 percent.

“It’s still a far cry from what we did in 2005,” Bell added. “But we’re starting to approach (new home) numbers we saw in 2001, 2002 — more conventional numbers.”

Lower prices lure some to move

The home construction uptick in Sumner County was likely triggered by homebuyers looking for an acre or more of land at bargain prices, said Matt Ward, agent with the Deselms Team Realty Group, which sells homes in Sumner and elsewhere in Middle Tennessee.

Perceived bargains and other factors are driving home building patterns and county-to-county moves by some residents.

“New properties that used to be out of the affordability reach in Williamson County have started to reposition in areas that are more affordable,” said MetroStudy’s Jason Brown. “We’re seeing more people move from Rutherford to Williamson for the quality of schools, and now the price point.”

Nonetheless, an uncertain job market and conservative lending standards that prevent some would-be buyers from securing loans remain high hurdles.

“What holds true is that in bad times, great locations remain desirable places to live,” Bell said. “Yet financing is still tight.”

Real estate observers said though all parts of Middle Tennessee continue to plod through distressed properties, Davidson seems to be the laggard in flushing them.

“The resell market is glutted with foreclosures and short sells,” said Tamara Senibaldi, a broker with Marquis, adding that many communities in greater Nashville continue to struggle with distressed properties more than some other neighborhoods on the periphery.

Jimmy Deatrick, vice president of Crye-Leike, said Wilson County’s subdivisions have been climbing in popularity as a result of homebuyers capitalizing on that county’s low property taxes.

“People have been flooding out of Davidson and Williamson to Wilson for years, but now they’re looking at the bottom line. Building and living here is cheaper than in the other counties.”

Most of the 98 houses that Goodall Homes built last year in Sumner County hovered around the $190,000 price point, according to Chief Operating Officer Keith Porterfield.

When the first-time buyer tax credit was still in place, the bulk of Goodall homes were lower priced and speculative, matching the demand, Porterfield said. Now, the majority of Goodall’s new homes are presold and mid-priced.

Permits half of peak

Still, the number of single-family home permits issued last year was roughly half the 2007 figure, according to county real estate records.

But some areas like Bellevue, Hermitage and Antioch appear to have emerged from the broad housing slump stronger than most others.

Take the Spencer Hill community off Haywood Lane in Antioch, for instance. There, a cluster of new homes in the $130,000 to $150,000 price range is expanding.

Around Hays Blackman Loop, a road recently built to accommodate the new addresses, nine new homes have been built in the past year, with many more under construction, helping fuel the 142 new home permits issued last year in Antioch.

Realtors say the area combines the best of both worlds: decent homes with smaller price tags.

“We’re seeing first-time buyer neighborhoods come together,” Senibaldi said. “Apartment dwellers who want to move into a home but stay in the area. You get a lot for your money in Antioch.”

Not all single-family home permits reflect a buyer’s new residence, though, warns Bill Hostettler of HND Realty.

In some ZIP codes like Antioch, where Hostettler is an investor, permits are taken out for town homes, which eventually will be rental property. “We’re pulling a lot of permits now, but we’re renting everything,” he said. “And people are standing in line to rent them.”

But the economics of MiddleTennessee’s housing market — rock-bottom prices and strikingly low interest rates — strongly favors buying, broker Lowenthal counters.

More consumers are beginning to take notice.

“People are realizing they can pay the same amount for a mortgage payment (as) rent,” Lowenthal said, “sometimes even cheaper.”

(Written by Bobby Allyn of the Tennessean.)